Posts tagged ‘melanoma’


Meet our doctors: Hematologist Amrita Krishnan on multiple myeloma

February 8, 2014 | by
Photo of Amrita Krishnan
Multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood plasma cells, is the second most common hematological malignancy in the U.S. (after non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and accounts for 1 percent of all cancers. It is generally thought to be incurable but highly treatable. Amrita Krishnan says new myeloma treatments can help patients lead active, productive lives. Amrita Krishnan, M.D., director of City of Hope’s Multiple Myeloma Program, says City of Hope is at the forefront of transforming the way myeloma is treated and that, as a result, more myeloma patients are able to live active, productive lives. What is multiple myeloma and are…

Future kidney cancer treatments show promise (w/VIDEO)

December 21, 2013 | by
Sumanta Kumar Pal
Treatments for kidney cancer have improved dramatically over the past few years — particularly for renal cell carcinoma, the most common type of kidney cancer. And the future looks bright as well. Treatment for cancer of the kidneys (shown here) is improving, with more advances expected. The Food and Drug Administration has approved seven new drugs for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma, especially significant because it approved only one drug between 1992 and 2005. Further, targeted therapies are improving standard care for patients with the disease, and several promising studies could lead to new treatment advances. Sumanta Kumar Pal,…

Meet our doctors: Julie Wolfson on cancer in teens, young adults

November 16, 2013 | by
Julie Wolfson
Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer have different needs and treatment challenges than children or older adults. They’re a unique population because they don’t fit into a distinct group, often falling into a gap between cancer treatment programs designed for children and those designed for adults. City of Hope pediatric oncologist Julie Wolfson Here, pediatric oncologist Julie Wolfson, M.D., M.S.H.S., discusses how the cancer experience differs for AYAs and how City of Hope’s multidisciplinary AYA team offers assistance and a network of professionals to support teens and young adults from the beginning of treatment through…

Melanoma: Some sun lovers increase UV exposure after diagnosis

October 10, 2013 | by
skin cancer
Once burned, twice shy? It would seem that anyone who has been diagnosed with melanoma – the most deadly type of skin cancer – would be doubly cautious about their future exposures to the sun. A melanoma diagnosis is not a deterrent for some sun lovers, research has found. Not so, according to a new study in JAMA Dermatology, published online Oct. 2. Because ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the primary risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), and CMM patients are at heightened risk of developing a second primary melanoma, researchers sought to shed light on…

Indoor tanning: For some women, it may be addictive

August 24, 2013 | by
A new study found that found that about 29 percent of white high school girls use tanning beds at least once a year, despite health risks.
Some women never learn. Despite the overwhelming risks of developing skin cancer through indoor tanning beds, young white women continue to do it at an alarming rate, a new study shows. A City of Hope expert suggests that a form of addiction may be to blame. A new study found that found that about 29 percent of white high school girls use tanning beds at least once a year, despite health risks. A review of earlier studies, published in the journal BMJ, found that using indoor tanning beds before the age of 35 increases melanoma…

Meet our doctors: Surgical oncologist Shawn Steen on communication

August 10, 2013 | by
Shawn Steen, M.D.
Doctor-patient communication is vital in the delivery of high-quality health care. A good relationship with a physician can boost patients’ self-confidence, motivation and positive view of  their health status, which can in turn influence their treatment outcomes and subsequent healing. Shawn Steen, a surgical oncologist, says that a good doctor-patient relationship is crucial not just for communication, but also for the healing process. Here Shawn Steen, M.D., a City of Hope Antelope Valley surgical oncologist specializing in the treatment of breast cancer, melanoma, endocrine disorders and abdominal malignancies, discusses the importance of patient-physician communication in cancer treatment,…

Skin cancer myths could increase your risk. Get the facts.

July 18, 2013 | by
The U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has deemed July to be Ultraviolet (UV) Safety Awareness Month.
With summer well underway, the importance of using sunscreen might seem obvious by now. And it is – to those not suffering from misconceptions about skin cancer. Those misconceptions, or myths, can end up raising the risk of skin cancer for some people. Understanding this, the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has deemed July to be Ultraviolet (UV) Safety Awareness Month. Such commitment is needed. Skin cancer continues to be the most common type of cancer in the United States – accounting for nearly half of all cancers – and UV rays…

What’s in your SPF? New sunscreen labels will tell you

June 7, 2013 | by
With summer just days away, it’s important to learn the new sunscreen regulations to help protect you and your family from sun-induced damage.
The importance of applying sunscreen to reduce the risk of skin cancer has been drilled into the public for the past few decades. Yet studies have shown that skin cancer rates continue to climb, with melanoma diagnoses rising nearly 2 percent a year since 2000. With summer just days away, it’s important to learn the new sunscreen regulations to help protect you and your family from sun-induced damage. What are people doing wrong? Skin cancer expert Vijay Trisal, M.D., an assistant professor in the Division of Surgical Oncology, said that consumers simply aren’t aware of what…

Melanoma isn’t only skin cancer that carries the risk of death

May 15, 2013 | by
A new JAMA study finds that the second most common form of skin cancer -- cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma -- carries a small risk of metastasis and death.
Melanoma is the skin cancer that’s most associated with being lethal, but a study in JAMA Dermatology suggests a much more common skin cancer also carries a risk of metastasis and death. A new JAMA study finds that the second most-common form of skin cancer -  cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma –  carries a small risk of metastasis and death. The 10-year retrospective study, led by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, examined outcomes for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, or CSCC, diagnosed between Jan. 1, 2001, and Dec. 31, 2009 – the largest study of CSCC outcomes…

‘The Big C’ offers teachable moment about ‘fighting’ cancer

May 6, 2013 | by
Dr. Vijay Trisal, medical consultant for Showtimes' "The Big C," understands why some patients might not appreciate the words "fighting" or "battling."
Sometimes, breakthroughs must be made not by researchers or individuals but by society. In a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times, City of Hope’s Vijay Trisal, M.D., describes a breakthrough that doesn’t seem to have occurred: widespread awareness that the outcome of a person’s cancer is not decided by how hard they fight. Vijay Trisal, medical consultant for Showtimes’ “The Big C,” understands why some patients might not appreciate the words “fighting” or “battling.” His response follows a question about Showtime’s “The Big C,” for which he was the medical consultant. Reporter Mary MacVean asks: “Cathy also…