Posts tagged ‘lung cancer’


Cancer research 2015: T cell immunotherapy, targeted drugs and more

January 1, 2015 | by

Every year, researchers make gains in the understanding of cancer, and physicians make gains in the treatment of cancer. As a result, every year, more cancer patients survive their disease.

2015 in cancer research

In 2015, cancer research will move forward in ways both high-profile and little-heralded.

In those ways, 2015 will be no different. What will be different are the specific research discoveries and the specific advances in screening and treatment. We asked City of Hope experts to weigh in on the research and treatment advances they predict for the year to come.

Some of those advances will make headlines around the world – expect to hear much more about T cell therapy and targeted drug therapy – while some will garner attention largely among those affected by, or treating, the disease.

But all will have an impact. » Continue Reading


Cancer statistics show decline in deaths, but new threats loom

December 31, 2014 | by

The American Cancer Society’s annual statistics show the death rate from cancer in the U.S. is down significantly from its peak more than a decade ago – certainly a reason to celebrate. But before the kudos give way to complacency, be forewarned: A number of increasingly serious public health issues could send cancer deaths and cancer incidence climbing again.

Cancer statistics don't tell whole picture

Breakthroughs in cancer treatment, early detection and reduction in smoking have resulted in a 22 percent decline in cancer deaths since 1991. But obesity could help send those numbers climbing again.

That’s the sobering perspective provided by City of Hope’s provost and chief scientific officer, Steven T. Rosen, M.D.

He added some context to the annual statistical analysis from the American Cancer Society. That analysis found that the death rate from cancer has dropped 22 percent from its peak in 1991; amounting to about 1.5 million deaths from cancer avoided. Between 2007 and 2011 – the most recent five years with data available – new cancer cases dropped by 1.8 percent per year in men and stayed the same in women. Cancer deaths decreased 1.8 percent per year in men and 1.4 percent in women for that same period of time.

Rosen attributed the overall decline in deaths to a number of factors, namely prevention, early detection and better therapies. » Continue Reading


Lung cancer 2015: It’s all about customization

December 30, 2014 | by
New targeted immune therapies can activate one's own immune system to attack lung cancer.

New targeted immune therapies can activate one’s own immune system to attack lung cancer.

Lung cancer experts understand the impact of molecular biology and the genetic makeup of  tumors more than ever before. Now they’re using that knowledge to great effect.

“Each person’s tumor is somewhat different,” said Karen Reckamp,  M.D., M.S., co-director of the Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program at City of Hope. “Now, with diagnoses and treatments, we’re focused on customizing in a precision way to attack a specific person’s cancer.”

Factor in a patient’s own immune system, which can attack lung cancer, and the ability to customize will grow even further. “There are new therapies that we’re looking at that activate a person’s own immune system against the lung cancer and seem to have some very durable long-term responses,” Reckamp said. And, she noted, they don’t rely on chemotherapy. » Continue Reading


The City of Hope difference? Take patients’ word for it, not ours

December 22, 2014 | by
The Wolfrank family stands atop City of Hope’s Rose Parade float during its preparation for the 2015 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California.

The Wolfrank family stands atop City of Hope’s Rose Parade float during its preparation for the 2015 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California.

“World-class expertise,” “leading-edge research” and “compassionate patient care” are not just words at City of Hope; they’re a way of life.

No one knows this more than City of Hope’s patients. On New Year’s Day, six of those patients and their loved ones – plus a nurse who is both a City of Hope caregiver and a patient – will ride City of Hope’s Rose Parade float, celebrating the tomorrows that the institution’s researchers, doctors and staff have made possible. Here’s what those patients have to say about City of Hope.

Gavin Wolfrank’s family:

“It’s been four years since Gavin’s transplant and, thanks to all the efforts of everyone at City of Hope, our life today is filled with laughter, happiness, determination, appreciation and love. We are inspired daily as we watch Gavin be a kid and enjoy all the things children should be able to enjoy. We know that City of Hope is working hard to save lives and we are eternally grateful for what they have done for us and continue to do for many others.” » Continue Reading


Lung metastasis isn’t the same as lung cancer. Know the difference

December 10, 2014 | by

lungsSometimes cancer found in the lungs is not lung cancer at all. It can be another type of cancer that originated elsewhere in the body and spread, or metastasized, to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These tumors are called lung metastases, or metastatic cancer to the lungs, and are not the same as lung cancer or even metastatic lung cancer.

Metastatic lung cancer originates in the lungs, but then spreads. It happens when cancer cells break away from the lungs and travel to other parts of the body, such as the brain or breasts. (Even though a cancerous growth may have formed in a different location, it is still named after the part of the body where it started.)

Lung metastases are different, and treatment of them requires a thorough understanding of the various types of lung tumors. Unfortunately, almost any cancer can metastasize to the lungs and initiate a lung metastasis. The most common cancers include bladder cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, kidney cancer, prostate cancer, neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and sarcoma. There’s no way around it – a lung metastasis is a serious, life-threatening condition that is difficult to treat successfully, although some patients may gain years through surgical removal of the tumor. » Continue Reading


Inspiring Stories: Vicky Graham has to remind herself she has lung cancer

December 4, 2014 | by
Vicky Graham defies the odds most lung cancer patients face and will  ride City of Hope's Rose Parade float to share her inspiring story

Vicky Graham, right, continues to defy the odds of many lung cancer patients and will ride City of Hope’s Rose Parade float with her husband, Michael Graham, and her daughter Amy Boyd, who became her caregiver during treatment. (Photo courtesy of Vicky Graham)

On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.”

By Vicky Graham

In August of 2007, I began testing for what I thought was just a swollen gland. Little did I know that after several frustrating months, tests and doctors later, that I’d be diagnosed with stage 3b nonsmall cell adenocarcinoma – lung cancer.  But, by the grace of God, my wonderful endocrinologist sent me to City of Hope for an evaluation by Dr. Karen Reckamp, co-director, Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program. Dr. Reckamp was determined to help me, even though my symptoms didn’t look anything like lung cancer.

I was immediately scheduled for testing at  City of Hope. I lived quite a distance from City of Hope, so all my appointments were stacked into one day when possible. From the moment my husband and I set foot on the campus, we were impressed. Every staff member was polite and helpful, from the receptionists to the doctors. We often laughed to ourselves that we were being treated like we were George and Laura Bush! We never had to anxiously wait weeks for appointments or to get test results. Most times, the doctors themselves called me at home to discuss results and next steps. » Continue Reading


Thinking about e-cigs for the Great American Smokeout? Think again

November 20, 2014 | by

Are you thinking about switching from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes for the Great American Smokeout? Are you thinking that might be a better option than the traditional quit-smoking route? Think again.

For lung expert Brian Tiep, M.D., the dislike and distrust he feels for e-cigs comes down to this: The public has been burned by tobacco companies before.

ecig electronic cigarette

With no labeling required for e-cigs, the consumer doesn’t know for sure what’s in the products.

The same companies that claimed cigarettes were safe, he says, now claim that electronic cigarettes – which aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration – are safe.

“I was opened-minded initially,” said Tiep, a physician in pulmonary and critical care medicine at City of Hope. “Then the tobacco companies started buying out the e-cigarette companies. These products have no regulations whatsoever right now. You’re trusting them to do the right thing by you. They claimed tobacco was safe, and it turned out not to be.”

As for tobacco cigarettes, a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association tied smoking among U.S. adults to 14 million health conditions. Further, a U.S. District Court judge who in 2006 found tobacco companies guilty of lying to the public about the dangers of smoking, ordered the companies to admit their wrongdoing. The judge ruled they defrauded the public in five key ways: lying about the health damage caused by smoking, lying about the addictive nature of nicotine, marketing “low tar” and “light” cigarettes as healthier with no evidence that they are, deliberately making their products as addictive as possible and hiding the dangers of secondhand smoke. » Continue Reading


If you fit these three criteria, you should get lung cancer screening

November 18, 2014 | by

lung cancer screening

Great strides have been made in treating cancer – including lung cancer – but by the time people show symptoms of the disease, the cancer has usually advanced. That’s because, at early stages, lung cancer has no symptoms.

Only recently has lung cancer screening become an option. (Read more about the risks and benefits.) The U.S. Preventive Task Force recommends screening with low-dose computed tomography (more commonly called a low-dose CT scan) for individuals who meet the following guidelines:

- Age 55 to 80
– Have a 30 pack-year smoking history. That is, the person smoked a pack a day for 30 years, or two packs a day for 15 years.
– Currently smoke or quit within the last 15 years. » Continue Reading


Lung cancer is a silent killer of women; if you’re at risk, get screened

November 13, 2014 | by

During October, everything seems to turn pink – clothing, the NFL logo, tape dispensers, boxing gloves, blenders, soup cans, you name it – in order to raise awareness for what many believe is the most dangerous cancer that affects women: breast cancer. But, in addition to thinking pink, women should also think pearl. That color represents lung cancer.

Lung cancer specialist Karen Reckamp, M.D.

Lung cancer isn’t just a smoker’s disease, or a male disease. Karen Reckamp, lung cancer specialist, gives her perspective on lung cancer in women.

Lung cancer is the No. 1 cancer killer of women, killing almost twice as many women as any other cancer. This year alone, it is estimated that lung cancer will claim the lives of 72,330 women.

When asked about the increasing rate of lung cancer in women, Karen Reckamp, M.D., M.S., co-director of the Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program at City of Hope, summed it up this way: “The main reason for the increase is due to smoking. The smoking trend began later among women, so we are now seeing the result. While there has been and overall lung cancer decline in the last decade, there are some places in the country, like the South, where rates for women are still increasing.”

But, Reckamp quickly points out that lung cancer is not just a smoker’s disease. Although smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, other factors increase risk of the disease as well, such as exposure to radon, air pollution, even genetics. » Continue Reading


Medicare will pay for lung cancer screening for many longtime smokers

November 11, 2014 | by

Former smokers age 55 to 74 who rely on Medicare for health care services have just received a long-hoped-for announcement. Under a proposed decision from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, they’ll now have access to lung cancer screening with a low-dose CT scan.

lung cancer screening

Medicare may cover lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scans for smokers ages 55 to 74 with a 30-year pack history.

The proposed decision, announced Monday, comes about seven months after a nonbinding panel shocked lung cancer doctors and experts nationwide by recommending against paying for the potentially lifesaving screening. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force had already embraced such screening in the wake of the National Lung Screening Trial, which determined that the scans are effective in detecting early-stage lung cancer. Private plans were (and still are) expected to cover the screening beginning in 2015.

“I think it’s great Medicare is going to be covering lung cancer screening,” said Dan Raz, M.D., co-director of City of Hope’s Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program. “Lung cancer is such an important disease and education is so important to predicting death.”

While the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) news is mostly good, it’s not without drawbacks. First, Medicare is covering people only up to age 74 – not age 80, as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended. Second, Medicare is mandating that all participating centers must submit data to a CMS-approved registry to get reimbursement – and there is no such registry right now. » Continue Reading