Posts tagged ‘lung cancer’


Lung metastasis isn’t the same as lung cancer. Know the difference

December 10, 2014 | by

lungsSometimes cancer found in the lungs is not lung cancer at all. It can be another type of cancer that originated elsewhere in the body and spread, or metastasized, to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These tumors are called lung metastases, or metastatic cancer to the lungs, and are not the same as lung cancer or even metastatic lung cancer.

Metastatic lung cancer originates in the lungs, but then spreads. It happens when cancer cells break away from the lungs and travel to other parts of the body, such as the brain or breasts. (Even though a cancerous growth may have formed in a different location, it is still named after the part of the body where it started.)

Lung metastases are different, and treatment of them requires a thorough understanding of the various types of lung tumors. Unfortunately, almost any cancer can metastasize to the lungs and initiate a lung metastasis. The most common cancers include bladder cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, kidney cancer, prostate cancer, neuroblastoma, Wilm’s tumor and sarcoma. There’s no way around it – a lung metastasis is a serious, life-threatening condition that is difficult to treat successfully, although some patients may gain years through surgical removal of the tumor. » Continue Reading


Inspiring Stories: Vicky Graham has to remind herself she has lung cancer

December 4, 2014 | by
Vicky Graham defies the odds most lung cancer patients face and will  ride City of Hope's Rose Parade float to share her inspiring story

Vicky Graham, right, continues to defy the odds of many lung cancer patients and will ride City of Hope’s Rose Parade float with her husband, Michael Graham, and her daughter Amy Boyd, who became her caregiver during treatment. (Photo courtesy of Vicky Graham)

On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.”

By Vicky Graham

In August of 2007, I began testing for what I thought was just a swollen gland. Little did I know that after several frustrating months, tests and doctors later, that I’d be diagnosed with stage 3b nonsmall cell adenocarcinoma – lung cancer.  But, by the grace of God, my wonderful endocrinologist sent me to City of Hope for an evaluation by Dr. Karen Reckamp, co-director, Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program. Dr. Reckamp was determined to help me, even though my symptoms didn’t look anything like lung cancer.

I was immediately scheduled for testing at  City of Hope. I lived quite a distance from City of Hope, so all my appointments were stacked into one day when possible. From the moment my husband and I set foot on the campus, we were impressed. Every staff member was polite and helpful, from the receptionists to the doctors. We often laughed to ourselves that we were being treated like we were George and Laura Bush! We never had to anxiously wait weeks for appointments or to get test results. Most times, the doctors themselves called me at home to discuss results and next steps. » Continue Reading


Thinking about e-cigs for the Great American Smokeout? Think again

November 20, 2014 | by

Are you thinking about switching from traditional cigarettes to e-cigarettes for the Great American Smokeout? Are you thinking that might be a better option than the traditional quit-smoking route? Think again.

For lung expert Brian Tiep, M.D., the dislike and distrust he feels for e-cigs comes down to this: The public has been burned by tobacco companies before.

ecig electronic cigarette

With no labeling required for e-cigs, the consumer doesn’t know for sure what’s in the products.

The same companies that claimed cigarettes were safe, he says, now claim that electronic cigarettes – which aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration – are safe.

“I was opened-minded initially,” said Tiep, a physician in pulmonary and critical care medicine at City of Hope. “Then the tobacco companies started buying out the e-cigarette companies. These products have no regulations whatsoever right now. You’re trusting them to do the right thing by you. They claimed tobacco was safe, and it turned out not to be.”

As for tobacco cigarettes, a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association tied smoking among U.S. adults to 14 million health conditions. Further, a U.S. District Court judge who in 2006 found tobacco companies guilty of lying to the public about the dangers of smoking, ordered the companies to admit their wrongdoing. The judge ruled they defrauded the public in five key ways: lying about the health damage caused by smoking, lying about the addictive nature of nicotine, marketing “low tar” and “light” cigarettes as healthier with no evidence that they are, deliberately making their products as addictive as possible and hiding the dangers of secondhand smoke. » Continue Reading


If you fit these three criteria, you should get lung cancer screening

November 18, 2014 | by

lung cancer screening

Great strides have been made in treating cancer – including lung cancer – but by the time people show symptoms of the disease, the cancer has usually advanced. That’s because, at early stages, lung cancer has no symptoms.

Only recently has lung cancer screening become an option. (Read more about the risks and benefits.) The U.S. Preventive Task Force recommends screening with low-dose computed tomography (more commonly called a low-dose CT scan) for individuals who meet the following guidelines:

- Age 55 to 80
– Have a 30 pack-year smoking history. That is, the person smoked a pack a day for 30 years, or two packs a day for 15 years.
– Currently smoke or quit within the last 15 years. » Continue Reading


Lung cancer is a silent killer of women; if you’re at risk, get screened

November 13, 2014 | by

During October, everything seems to turn pink – clothing, the NFL logo, tape dispensers, boxing gloves, blenders, soup cans, you name it – in order to raise awareness for what many believe is the most dangerous cancer that affects women: breast cancer. But, in addition to thinking pink, women should also think pearl. That color represents lung cancer.

Lung cancer specialist Karen Reckamp, M.D.

Lung cancer isn’t just a smoker’s disease, or a male disease. Karen Reckamp, lung cancer specialist, gives her perspective on lung cancer in women.

Lung cancer is the No. 1 cancer killer of women, killing almost twice as many women as any other cancer. This year alone, it is estimated that lung cancer will claim the lives of 72,330 women.

When asked about the increasing rate of lung cancer in women, Karen Reckamp, M.D., M.S., co-director of the Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program at City of Hope, summed it up this way: “The main reason for the increase is due to smoking. The smoking trend began later among women, so we are now seeing the result. While there has been and overall lung cancer decline in the last decade, there are some places in the country, like the South, where rates for women are still increasing.”

But, Reckamp quickly points out that lung cancer is not just a smoker’s disease. Although smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, other factors increase risk of the disease as well, such as exposure to radon, air pollution, even genetics. » Continue Reading


Medicare will pay for lung cancer screening for many longtime smokers

November 11, 2014 | by

Former smokers age 55 to 74 who rely on Medicare for health care services have just received a long-hoped-for announcement. Under a proposed decision from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, they’ll now have access to lung cancer screening with a low-dose CT scan.

lung cancer screening

Medicare may cover lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scans for smokers ages 55 to 74 with a 30-year pack history.

The proposed decision, announced Monday, comes about seven months after a nonbinding panel shocked lung cancer doctors and experts nationwide by recommending against paying for the potentially lifesaving screening. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force had already embraced such screening in the wake of the National Lung Screening Trial, which determined that the scans are effective in detecting early-stage lung cancer. Private plans were (and still are) expected to cover the screening beginning in 2015.

“I think it’s great Medicare is going to be covering lung cancer screening,” said Dan Raz, M.D., co-director of City of Hope’s Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program. “Lung cancer is such an important disease and education is so important to predicting death.”

While the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) news is mostly good, it’s not without drawbacks. First, Medicare is covering people only up to age 74 – not age 80, as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended. Second, Medicare is mandating that all participating centers must submit data to a CMS-approved registry to get reimbursement – and there is no such registry right now. » Continue Reading


My lung cancer diagnosis: What I wish I’d known – Dee Hunt

November 10, 2014 | by
lung cancer patient

Dee Hunt, a lung cancer survivor, has advocated for more lung cancer funding and a broader understanding of the disease. It’s not just a smokers’ disease, she says. (Photo courtesy of Dee Hunt)

Dee Hunt never smoked.

Neither did her five sisters and brothers. They didn’t have exposure to radon or asbestos, either. That didn’t prevent every one of them from being diagnosed with lung cancer.

Their parents were smokers, but they’d all left home more than 30 years before any of them were diagnosed. For most of her life, secondhand smoke was not ever raised as a health risk or concern.

“I thought it was only smoking-related,” Hunt said in a recent interview of her early impressions of lung cancer. Now she knows better. “It’s in our environment. It’s what we breathe. It’s in our genes.”

Hunt’s older sister died of lung cancer only six months after being diagnosed with the disease. That diagnosis was preceded by three years of being misdiagnosed with pneumonia.

That ordeal prompted Hunt, now 58, to take her health into her own hands. She began pushing for a screening of her lungs to identify any cancer. She ultimately got the screening and, when she did, doctors discovered a small tumor. Her other siblings followed suit, with all of them ultimately diagnosed with tumors of various sizes. » Continue Reading


What’s in cigarette smoke? Find out in this video

November 4, 2014 | by


What do rat poison, rocket fuel and embalming fluid have in common?

They all share ingredients found in cigarette smoke.

Once a cigarette is lit, it releases more than 7,000 chemicals into the air, many of them both toxic and carcinogenic. A recent Journal of the American Medical Association study attributed 14 million medical conditions to smoking tobacco products.

About one in five deaths in the United States are caused by smoking – more than HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries and firearm-related incidents combined. It’s also linked to around 85 percent of lung cancers. Check out our video to see what’s in cigarette smoke.

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Learn more about lung cancer research and treatment at City of Hope, as well as lung cancer screening.

Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting us online or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Lung cancer isn’t just a smoker’s disease: Know the risk factors

November 3, 2014 | by

The single largest risk factor for lung cancer is smoking, and it contributes to the overwhelming majority of lung cancer cases.

lungs

While smoking is the top risk factor for lung cancer, a growing number of patients never smoked. Here are other risk factors that are known and being studied.

That’s old news, of course. What might be news to many people is that, although smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, it’s not the only cause. In fact, a growing number of cases are occurring in patients who never smoked and who did not have significant exposure to secondhand smoke.

About 15 percent of lung cancers are diagnosed in people who do not smoke. Further, about 60 percent or more occur in nonsmokers, including people who never smoked and those who quit many years before their diagnosis.

Success in smoking education and cessation efforts means fewer smokers, but as the numbers of smokers developing lung cancer declines, scientists are recognizing how much we have to learn about the causes of this disease.

Other lung cancer risk factors: » Continue Reading


For November, 30 facts (one a day) about lung cancer

November 1, 2014 | by

Lung cancer is a men’s health issue. It’s a women’s health issue. The truth is, anyone can get lung cancer.

lung cancer

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Today 400,000 survivors live in the U.S. More research and screening is needed to keep that number on the rise.

Arriving on the calendar after month-long (and higher profile) awareness campaigns for prostate and breast cancers, Lung Cancer Awareness Month calls for more research, more breakthroughs, and more understanding of a disease that kills more Americans than prostate cancer and breast cancer combined.

Through breakthroughs in screening and diagnosis, targeted medications and more advanced surgeries, more people are surviving the disease than ever before. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT scans can prevent 20 percent of lung cancer deaths by identifying them early.

Among the discoveries in this growing body of research is that – as with all cancers – no one is immune from lung cancer risk. Lung cancer is often considered to be a disease that affects only the elderly, or a disease that affects only smokers. Smoking is indeed the top risk factor – so quitting smoking is a huge step toward reducing risk – but it’s not the only factor.

More cases of the disease are found in nonsmokers every year. About 15 percent of all cases are in never-smokers. About 60 percent of cases are patients who quit many years ago or who never smoked at all.

Although lung cancer is by far the top cause of cancer death for both men and women, many don’t seem to realize this fact. This spring, the American Lung Association released the results of its first Women’s Lung Health Barometer, a survey of more than 1,000 women. Only 1 percent of women named lung cancer as a top-of-mind cancer. Further, 78 percent did not know the disease has killed more women than breast cancer since 1987.

Together, we can raise awareness of, and reduce deaths attributed to, lung cancer. To that end, we offer 30 facts (one for each day of November) about lung cancer.

» Continue Reading