Posts tagged ‘Cy Stein’


Supreme Court ruling on gene patents sets precedent, experts say

June 17, 2013 | by
One June 13, the Supreme Court ruled that human genes are not patentable, thus allowing other companies to test for BRCA gene mutations at a fraction of the current price.
Months after hearing the arguments and weeks before concluding its current session, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that human genes are a product of nature and are not patentable. On June 13, the Supreme Court ruled that human genes are not patentable, thus allowing other companies to test for BRCA gene mutations at a fraction of the current price. In the court’s majority opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote: “A naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated.” The immediate effect of the June 13 ruling: Myriad Genetics…

ASCO 2013: Drug shortage impacts oncologists, patients (VIDEO)

June 4, 2013 | by
Diabetes destroys the body's insulin-producing islet cells, requiring type 1 diabetics to get it from other sources.
The annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) offers more than a way to highlight the numerous advances toward a cure for cancer. It also allows for reflection on barriers to quality research and optimal care. A briefing Friday focused on the impact of declining public funds for cancer research; today, a presentation called attention to the prevailing problem of cancer drug shortages. For this report, ASCO had randomly selected its members for a survey from March to September 2012. Of the 250 responses received, 214 were used for this study. Among the findings: More…

Forgo cancer screening? No thanks, say older Americans

March 17, 2013 | by
Some have questioned the value of some medical screenings for older Americans. But the older Americans themselves haven't. In fact, they're likely to view with distrust a doctor who advises they forego such tests.
In recent years, older Americans have been advised to stop undergoing certain cancer screenings — such as Pap smears and prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, tests — because experts say they can lead to costly, risky and unnecessary medical procedures. What do senior citizens think of this advice? Not much. Some have questioned the value of some medical screenings for older Americans. But the older Americans themselves haven’t. In fact, they’re likely to view with distrust a doctor who advises they forego such tests. At least that’s the perception of many of those interviewed for a study published March…

Blood thinners might prolong life for prostate cancer patients

February 22, 2013 | by
Aspirin may have the potential to shape lung cancer treatment. (Credit: Dynamic Graphics / Thinkstock)
Being on a blood-thinning medication is not unusual. In the U.S., more than 2 million people take the drugs. But although blood-thinners are well-known for their ability to prevent dangerous blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke, new research suggests they may also be useful against prostate cancer. A new study suggests a link between blood-thinning medication and prostate cancer survival, but experts advise against automatically reaching for the aspirin bottle. (Credit: Dynamic Graphics / Thinkstock) In a study involving 247 men with metastatic prostate cancer, researchers found that men who took blood-thinning medication in…

To fight cancer, get screened – regularly

February 22, 2013 | by
Review of eight studies on mammograms concludes breast cancer screening should be based on a woman's individual risk.
One in a series of articles about how to reduce the risk of cancer… The adage “you can’t fix what you don’t know is broken” rings particularly true for cancers, where early detection means more effective treatments and better survival odds. Mammograms and other recommended screenings can help catch cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages However, too many Americans neglect to get these potentially lifesaving tests. According to a 2012 Frontiers in Oncology study surveying more than 170,000 U.S. participants, aside from colorectal cancer screening, Americans fell short of meeting the screening goals set…

‘Drug holidays’ might help melanoma, but probably not all cancers

January 10, 2013 | by
Researchers might overcome drug resistant-melanoma by using intermittent treatment instead of standard treatment.
Cancer cells can build up a resistance to the drugs commonly used to combat the disease – it’s one of cancer’s many defensive survival mechanisms. In a research letter published Jan. 9 in the journal Nature, however, researchers report that intermittent treatment appears to have helped overcome drug-resistant melanoma in the lab. The results are promising, but they’re hardly ready for prime-time. Researchers might overcome drug resistant-melanoma by using intermittent treatment instead of standard treatment. Cy Stein, M.D., Ph.D., City of Hope’s Arthur and Rosalie Kaplan Chair and Professor of the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics…

Prostate cancer: The top treatment advances in 2012

December 28, 2012 | by
Slide of prostate cancer
Advances in prostate cancer treatment probably won’t make most Americans’ list of top 2012 events, but for some men, and their families, such developments stand out among the year’s medical news. Two FDA approvals topped the list of advances in treatment of prostate cancer (shown here via slide) during 2012, one City of Hope expert says. Cy Stein, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director for clinical research, holds up two 2012 events as being particularly significant in the treatment of prostate cancer. One was  the FDA approval of the drug enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of men…

Prostate cancer treatments have evolved; some private urologists haven’t

November 13, 2012 | by
Photo of senior man walking
Too many urologists are failing their patients with late-stage prostate cancer. So says Cy Stein, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director for clinical research at City of Hope’s Comprehensive Cancer Center. Stein, who holds the Arthur and Rosalie Kaplan Chair and Professor of the Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research, says treatments for prostate cancer — even advanced prostate cancer — have changed. But some private practice urologists haven’t kept up. Instead of referring patients to medical oncologists for specialized care or telling them about the many clinical trials now available, such doctors simply continue treating…