Posts tagged ‘City of Hope’


Second opinion: A cancer surgeon shares his perspective and advice

July 23, 2014 | by

Diagnostic errors are far from uncommon. In fact, a recent study found that they affect about 12 million people, or 1 in 20 patients,  in the U.S. each year.

medical chart and second opinions

Diagnosed with cancer? Get a second opinion at an expert research and treatment center like City of Hope. Clayton Lau, M.D., explains why it could save your life.

With cancer, those errors in diagnosis can have a profound impact. A missed or delayed diagnosis can make the disease that much harder to treat, as the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research recently noted in calling attention to the diagnostic errors research.

This means that patients who’ve been diagnosed with cancer shouldn’t always assume that either the diagnosis or their options are precisely what they’ve been told. Sometimes a cancer has progressed more than the diagnostic tests suggest; sometimes it’s progressed less. And sometimes the diagnosis is completely off-base.

Clayton S. Lau, M.D., associate clinical professor and an expert in testicular cancer surgery at City of Hope, explains the difference that second opinions can make in getting a proper cancer diagnosis and care. » Continue Reading


Brain tumors: One surgeon’s quest to transform the future (w/VIDEO)

July 21, 2014 | by

Brain surgery is not for the faint of heart. It takes courage, as well as curiosity and compassion. The truly great surgeons also have a desire to find new, and better ways, of healing the brain. Enter Behnam Badie, M.D., chief of neurosurgery at City of Hope.

Now a pioneer in brain tumor treatment, Badie entered medicine because of encouragement from his father. Healthy at the time, the family patriarch later succumbed to a brain tumor, the type of cancer in which his son now specializes.

Driven in part by that experience, Badie has since gone beyond the operating room. He wanted to help not just today’s patients, but also tomorrow’s patients. Through collaborations with other scientists and other clinicians, he knew he could conduct groundbreaking research that would help both.

City of Hope allows him to do all of this. That’s why he’s here.

Badie is now working to transform brain tumor treatment through research collaborations using nanoparticles, engineered T cells, engineered stem cells and other novel treatments.

The device that he’s developing “will transform the way we do brain tumor treatment,” he says. “My research gives me hope.”

Watch his story.

And read the story of Bridget Hanchette. Diagnosed with grade IV glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of malignant brain tumor, the Wisconsin mother of three was told by her doctor that she had only a year to live. A second doctor told her the same thing. Finally she came to City of Hope for an appointment with Badie. That was five years ago. 

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Learn more about getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting us online or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


In acute myeloid leukemia treatment, infighting just might be positive

July 18, 2014 | by

Elizabeth Budde, M.D., Ph.D., wants to encourage infighting. She aims to turn the immune system on itself — to the benefit of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, or AML.

Budde recieves grant to support her study on T cells and AML.

In a new treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, Elizabeth Budde is using modified white blood cells to attack their malignant cousins.

AML arises when abnormal white blood cells grow out of control, amassing in the bone marrow and interfering with normal blood cell development. Blood stem cell transplants are the only hope of cure for most patients with AML; however, many patients eventually see their cancer return.

Budde wants to give patients with relapsed AML a fighting chance by giving them modified white blood cells that attack their malignant cousins.

Her work is garnering increased attention. Budde, an assistant professor in the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope, has been chosen as The Jake Wetchler Foundation for Innovative Pediatric Cancer Research-Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Clinical Investigator. The accompanying $450,000 grant will support her studies for the next three years.

» Continue Reading


A bone marrow transplant on an outpatient basis? For some patients, yes

July 17, 2014 | by

Six, to date; more soon. Outpatient bone marrow transplants, that is.

City of Hope is expanding the transplant services to more patients by delivering care on an outpatient basis.

City of Hope is now providing bone marrow transplant services to some patients on an outpatient basis.

Finding new ways to deliver quality care with the greatest benefit is a priority for a patient-centered institution like City of Hope. For example, not every bone marrow transplant patient needs to check into the hospital for treatment. In fact, some might even benefit from remaining outpatients.

City of Hope’s new day hospital is designed to address their needs.

Studies have shown that day hospitals can meet clinical standards for bone marrow transplants without compromising patient quality of care. They allow patients to be treated as outpatients rather than inpatients, which lets them go home after their treatment. The result can be greater patient satisfaction and an improved patient experience. » Continue Reading


Each day is special for cancer survivors (w/VIDEO)

July 16, 2014 | by

The best measure of success in the fight against cancer is in lives saved and families intact, in extra days made special simply because they exist.

Yuman Fong, M.D., chair of the Department of Surgery at City of Hope, understands what precedes that special awareness. When cancer strikes, one minute a person may feel healthy and young, he says, and in the next, they’re wondering how many years they have left.

In those situations, expertise matters. Commitment to research, knowledge of new therapies, unrelenting dedication to quality and improvement all play a role in the best possible cancer care. City of Hope has those factors. But the best measure of cancer care is cancer outcomes – and City of Hope has those, too.

» Continue Reading


‘U.S.News’ again ranks City of Hope among best hospitals for cancer

July 15, 2014 | by

In cancer, expertise matters. So do survival rates, patient safety, patient services and many other factors. City of Hope understands this, as does U.S.News & World Report.

The magazine’s 2014-2015 list of best hospitals for cancer once again includes City of Hope, ranking the institution 12 out of 900 eligible for consideration. The annual rankings recognize the nation’s premier hospitals, and inclusion on the list is widely considered an indicator of quality care.

City of Hope’s ranking is three positions higher than last year’s ranking and marks the 11th year that City of Hope has made the “Best Hospitals” list for cancer treatment. The ranking – above the ranking of many other nationally known and considerably larger institutions – highlights the institution’s increasing reputation for high quality care and outcomes. » Continue Reading


Her breast cancer diagnosis was grim; a second opinion saved her life

July 15, 2014 | by

At 29, Kommah McDowell was a successful young professional engaged to be married to her best friend. She worked in the financial services sector and kick-boxed to keep in shape and to relax. Then came the diagnosis of triple-negative inflammatory breast cancer, a rare and very aggressive form of breast cancer. She was told she had a 5 percent chance of living two years. Here’s her story …

breast cancer

Kommah McDowell, a breast cancer survivor, serves as a mentor for black women who recently completed breast cancer treatment and are transitioning into the follow-up stage of their care.

For seven months, McDowell had been visiting her primary care doctor every other week complaining of pain, tenderness, swelling and a lump in her right breast. She was assured it was only a benign cyst that would go away – she was too young to have cancer. Finally, at McDowell’s insistence, the “cyst” was removed. During that surgery, the doctor found cancer.

“Unbelievably, the medical staff was not familiar with the type of cancer,” McDowell said. “They just knew it was cancer and the best course of action was to remove it immediately. Fortunately, I was able to go to City of Hope for a second opinion and treatment.” » Continue Reading


As brain tumor patient learned, sometimes a second opinion isn’t enough

July 11, 2014 | by

At age 44, Bridget Hanchette, a mother of three from La Crosse, Wisconsin, was diagnosed with grade IV glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of malignant brain tumor.

Bridget's doctors told her she only had a year to live. Then she met neurosurgeon Dr. Badie. That was 5 years ago.

Former brain tumor patient Bridget Hanchette is thankful she found neurosurgeon Behnam Badie, M.D. Other doctors told she had only a year to live; he saved her life. This past June, she celebrated being cancer-free for five-years.

The cancer grows and spreads quickly, making it difficult to treat. Most patients with this diagnosis are not given much hope, but Hanchette’s initial consult and even her second opinion came with more grim news: Surgery was off the table. Because of the location of the tumor, an operation would likely leave her paralyzed.

With surgery no longer an option, she was told that she only had about a year to live. That answer did not sit well with Hanchette and her family.

“After hearing that no one could touch my tumor, that it was inoperable, incurable and I’d only have a year to live supposedly, we decided to continue our quest to find a more hopeful path,” Hanchette said.

That path led her to City of Hope and neurosurgeon Behnam Badie, M.D., director of the Brain Tumor Program at City of Hope.

» Continue Reading


Parents can boost academic performance of childhood cancer survivors

July 10, 2014 | by

Survival rates for childhood cancer have improved tremendously over the past few decades, but postcancer care hasn’t always kept up. More children than ever are now coping with long-term complications and side effects caused by their disease and treatment — one of those being learning difficulties.

City of Hope research shows parent intervention may help childhood cancer survivors improve their performance in school.

City of Hope research shows parent intervention may help childhood cancer survivors improve their performance in school.

A new study, published last month in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology and led by City of Hope researchers, suggests that parents can reduce the impact of cancer and cancer treatment on their children’s academic performance.

“It is possible to improve the child’s adaptive functioning in his or her daily life,” said lead author and neuropsychologist Sunita Patel, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Population Sciences and Department of Supportive Care Medicine at City of Hope. “For the educational realm, parents can facilitate this by helping the child establish good study strategies and to teach the child that learning requires active engagement and effort.”

For the study, researchers analyzed the academic performance of childhood cancer survivors who had cancer treatment affecting their central nervous system. This group of survivors tends to experience long-term cognitive side effects, making it harder for them to retain information in school.

» Continue Reading


Bladder cancer patient finds he has an alternative to external device

July 9, 2014 | by

When Sheldon Querido, a retired manufacturer’s representative, was diagnosed with bladder cancer, his doctor told him that he’d need to have his bladder removed – and that he’d have to wear an external urine-collection bag for the rest of his life.

Neobladder

An artificial bladder, called a neobladder, enables patients to urinate normally, eliminating the need for an external bag and allowing patients to transition back to their normal life after surgery.

“My first response was ‘I don’t want to live like that,” Querido told ABC 7 in a recent interview. “That’s gonna be a terrible way to live.”

Querido simply couldn’t accept that collecting his urine externally was his only option. The Thousand Oaks resident and his wife decided to get a second opinion at City of Hope. There, they learned there was indeed another choice: an artificial bladder, called a neobladder, built by specialists at City of Hope. » Continue Reading