Posts tagged ‘cancer survivor’


#LastChemo: ‘Attitude is everything,’ says 21-year-old cancer survivor

February 16, 2015 | by
#lastchemo: young cancer survivor

Rhabdomyosarcoma survivor Trevor Hoffman, 21, celebrates his #LastChemo with a solid plan for 2015.

Trevor Hoffman was only 21 when he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, but not even cancer could keep him off his motorcycles. (He has one for racing, and a couple just for fun.) Now a cancer survivor, Hoffman, who lives in La Verne, California, wrapped up his treatment Jan. 19 – just one day after his 21st birthday.

What was your diagnosis?

I was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. [Also known as RMS, rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue tumor in children, leading to tumors in muscles attached to bones. Although it can occur in many places in the body, the most common areas are the head, neck, arms, legs and urogenital tract.]

What would you tell other patients about to undergo chemotherapy? In other words, what do you know now that you wish you’d known then?

It’s definitely going to be a tough road no matter what. But attitude is everything. Try to keep the best focus on the outcome in the end. Keep a positive attitude. Even though it was a year of craziness, that was one of the things I felt I had the entire time. » Continue Reading


#LastChemo: ‘It takes a village,’ says breast cancer survivor

February 9, 2015 | by

Michele Dahlstein, a 50-year-old breast cancer survivor from Upland, California, celebrated her last day of chemotherapy on Dec. 30. She shares her story in her own words:

breast cancer survivor

Breast cancer survivor Michele Dahlstein proudly shows off the medal commemorating her last chemo treatment.

I was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma stage 2) on Aug. 11, 2014, after my yearly mammogram at City of Hope’s Women’s Health Center, followed by a screening mammogram and biopsy. After consultations with Dr. Laura Kruper and Dr. James Andersen, I underwent a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction on Sept. 15, 2014.

Because I had two positive lymph nodes, I also underwent four rounds of chemo (after consulting with Dr. James Waisman).  I began my chemo on Oct. 30, 2014, and had my last one Dec. 30, 2014. My first chemo was the roughest. I experienced many side effects. Now that I’m finished with my treatment, I’m looking forward to getting back to my “normal” life ( having more energy, teaching, exercising, traveling and tasting food).

It takes a village! Thank you my family, friends, everyone at City of Hope’s Women’s Health Center, Dr. Kruper, Dr. Andersen, Liz Yates, Dr. Wasiman and Lori Rezanek-Kells. You’re the best!!!

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Have a #LastChemo photo or story to share? Share with us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or by email at media@coh.org.

Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Inspiring Stories: Nurse is also colon cancer survivor

December 16, 2014 | by

On Jan. 1, 2015, six City of Hope patients who have journeyed through cancer will welcome the new year with their loved ones atop City of Hope’s Tournament of Roses Parade float. The theme of the float is “Made Possible by HOPE.” The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories.”

Representing City of Hope’s nursing and clinical care teams will be Anne Bourque, R.N., clinical nursing director in the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. But Bourque also has her own patient story to tell. Here, the 35-year veteran of City of Hope relates her experience with colon cancer.

By Anne Bourque

Clinical nursing director and colon cancer survivor, Anne Bourque

City of Hope nurse, Anne Bourque, is also a colon cancer survivor. Shown here with her fiancée, Steve Barnard, she’ll ride City of Hope’s Rose Parade float on New Year’s Day. The theme of the parade is “Inspiring Stories;” the theme of the float is “Made Possible by Hope.”

I have two stories: one as an employee of City of Hope, and one as colon cancer survivor treated at City of Hope.

I am a registered nurse and started working at City of Hope in 1980 when I was 25. I can honestly say accepting a job here was one of the best decisions that I have made in my life. I have worked with some of the most talented and remarkable colleagues, and knowing many of them for 30-plus years has enriched my life tremendously.

Fast forward to 2002: Then, as now, I was the clinical nursing director of hematology and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. I was divorced, with two children  – Elizabeth, who was 19, and Gregory, who was 14.

I was 47, had some bleeding and went for a colonoscopy at a different hospital. I had no desire to have any City of Hope physician see me with less than my normal work clothes on, so naturally, I would have the test done elsewhere.

On Feb. 13, on the colonoscopy table, I found out that I had colon cancer. » Continue Reading


Children with cancer, Part 3: Transitioning from patient to survivor

July 7, 2014 | by

John Cloer was three months shy of his third birthday in 2004 when he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For the next three and a half years, he received chemotherapy at City of Hope, finally obtaining long-term remission.

childhood cancer survivor John Cloer

The challenges of a cancer diagnosis don’t stop with treatment. Survivorship brings its own challenges, as John Cloer, a former leukemia patient at City of Hope, knows well.

His parents Bill and Gina, along with John and his younger brother Steve, recently sat down to reflect on that experience, sharing tips for family members and friends of children with cancer, as well as advice for parents of children with cancer. Here, they and City of Hope pediatric nurse Karla Wilson, R.N., M.S.N., discuss the sometimes difficult transition from treatment to survivorship.

In this third of a three-part series, they describe the transition from patient to survivor.

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Some of the cancer treatments that save children’s lives also may produce life-altering side effects that don’t materialize for years.

During the Cloers’ annual visit to City of Hope’s Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, Wilson reviews John’s medical progress, and reminds his parents about conditions they’ll need to monitor.

When alerting patients that they may be prone to future therapy-related conditions, Wilson said she always tries to drive home one message above all: Just because survivors are at risk for a condition doesn’t mean they’ll necessarily develop it. » Continue Reading


Children with cancer, Part 2: How parents can help their kids

June 30, 2014 | by

John Cloer was three months shy of his third birthday in 2004 when he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For the next three and a half years, he received chemotherapy at City of Hope, finally obtaining long-term remission.

John Cloer

Now 13, John Cloer, right with younger brother Steve, was only 3 when he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. His parents learned the hard way how to cope with a new array of parenting challenges. Shown here: John (right) with his brother, Steve.

His parents Bill and Gina, along with John and his younger brother Steve, recently sat down to reflect on that experience, sharing tips for family members and friends of children with cancer and now, their advice for parents facing a similar challenge.

In this second of a three-part series, they answer the question:

How can parents help their children with cancer? 

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1. Numb the pain. Perhaps because he still remembers caregivers frantically trying to start an IV in him the day he was diagnosed, John still dreads IVs and injections. The Cloers now ask nurses to use lidocaine to numb a site before the needle goes in. (They pay for this off-protocol request, but find it worth the costs.)

In the early days of John’s illness, the tense toddler used to “rub the rubber right off his pacifier,” said Bill. “I wish we had had a better tool set to manage his anxiety,” he added. Gina regrets they didn’t get John into the habit of meditating before procedures, “a coping skill I wish he’d have now.” » Continue Reading


Children with cancer, Part 1: How family members and friends can help

June 23, 2014 | by

John Cloer became a teenager in May, an ordinary rite of passage made extraordinary because he is a cancer survivor – one of an estimated 370,000 pediatric cancer survivors in the U.S.

Childhood cancer patient John Cloer

The parents of John Cloer, now a childhood cancer survivor, learned many lessons during his treatment for leukemia. Photo courtesy of the Cloer family.

He was three months shy of his third birthday in 2004 when what his parents Bill and Gina Cloer assumed was the flu was diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For the next three and a half years, John received chemotherapy – eventually leading to his long-term remission.

John finally became well enough to attend kindergarten and enjoy normal pursuits like T-ball. In fact, his perseverance (from staying late to practice, to reveling in teammates’ progress) earned the 6-year-old an invitation to play T-ball on the White House lawn and meet President George Bush. He has long raised awareness for City of Hope, from presenting an award to singer Miley Cyrus to riding on the hospital’s 2014 Tournament of Roses float as his sister Heather, a City of Hope nurse, walked alongside.

When John was embarking on cancer treatment, Bill and Gina were given well-tested roadmaps from oncologists adept at keeping children alive. On the comparatively uncharted path of cancer survivorship, they have longed for a similar roadmap. Along with regular follow-up visits with doctors such as Clarke Anderson, M.D., the Cloers are being helped in their survivorship journey by City of Hope’s Childhood Cancer Survivorship Program, led by Smita Bhatia, M.D., M.P.H., the Ruth Ziegler Chair in Populations Sciences, and nurse practitioner Karla Wilson, M.S.N., R.N.

In this program, John and his family receive a comprehensive medical summary of his diagnosis and treatment, as well as an individualized review of his potential late-effects from treatment.

Bill, Gina, John and his younger brother, Steve, recently sat down around their dining room table and offered some advice to parents of children with cancer, along with well-meaning family and friends.

In this first of a three-part series, they answer the question:

What can family/friends do to help parents whose children have cancer?

» Continue Reading


For runner Michele Sturt, this journey began with a lymph node

May 22, 2014 | by

Every patient story is unique and, so in its own way, inspiring. Here, Michele Sturt – a runner, a nurse and a mother of four – shares her story of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and of her ultimate treatment at City of Hope.

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I was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2007 when I was 54 years old. I had been a runner since I was in my early twenties and used running as my gauge to my personal wellness status. How fast, how much effort, how many aches and pains, how many personal bests … these have been my general health parameters for many years. In other words, aside from various weekend warrior accidents, I had been quite healthy until I was told I had non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

patient Michele Sturt

Michele Sturt of Petoskey, Michigan, has long used running as her gauge of personal health. Before she was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, her running signaled to her that something wasn’t quite right. Now, almost a year post-bone marrow transplant at City of Hope, she’s running once more. Here, she runs near a son’s home in Santa Barbara. Photo courtesy of Michele Sturt.

I had noticed that I was really having a hard time keeping up with my running friends. I was working too hard and not getting anywhere fast. I also had a single small inguinal lymph node that was new. It didn’t bother me other than I knew it wasn’t normal. Besides being a runner, I am also a nurse practitioner in internal medicine.

First, I waited the obligatory four to six weeks to see if it would go away. I also complained to one of the doctors I work with, and she felt I should have the node biopsied and be done with it. The general surgeon gave me the option of waiting longer before doing anything, but at that point I wanted the node out and evaluated. I was tired but had no other symptoms.

My diagnosis was non-Hodgkin lymphoma, specifically indolent follicular B cell, a slow-growing, not curable but treatable form of lymphoma.

So, now what? I didn’t feel like I had cancer. I had lived an unusually clean and healthy life, although crazy busy and active, and I was the last person you would expect to have cancer, unless you knew what I knew – it’s a dice throw and I just crapped out. With only one oncologist available in my hometown of Petoskey, Michigan, at that time, I needed to figure out where to go for answers. » Continue Reading


Bladder cancer patient fought symptoms for 15 years (w/VIDEO)

March 13, 2014 | by

Christine Crews thought she had a bladder infection. Turns out, the Memphis, Tenn., resident had bladder cancer. For 15 years, she fought it with chemotherapy and occasional tumor removals.

When the cancer spread to 80% of her bladder, she was told she would need to have her entire bladder removed. She got a second opinion. And another. Crews wasn’t comfortable with any of the recommendations; she wanted other options. When a urologist friend recommended she call City of Hope, she did.

“They actually listened to what I wanted from the surgery,” Crews said. “They were able to give me options that other hospitals were not able to give me.”

In the video above, Crews shares her story to help other people with bladder cancer understand just how special City of Hope is, and what their options really are.

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Support bladder cancer research at City of Hope and your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar, up to $100,000, by our friends at the Post-it® Brand from 3M. Donate now.

Learn more about City of Hope’s bladder cancer program.

Read the Breakthroughs post “8 questions and answers about bladder cancer.”

 

 


Is an epidemic of thyroid cancer really an epidemic of diagnosis?

February 25, 2014 | by

An epidemic of thyroid cancer in the U.S. is actually an epidemic of diagnosis, conclude the authors of a new report. Their analysis pointed out that, although thyroid cancer diagnoses have nearly tripled during the past 30 years, mortality rates have remained the same. To them, this means the disease has been dramatically overdiagnosed.

Screening for thyroid cancer

Thyroid cancer is overdiagnosed, a new study bluntly claims. A City of Hope expert disagrees, pointing to mortality data as proof that screening works. Here, a woman undergoes screening for thyroid abnormalities.

City of Hope thyroid cancer expert John Yim, M.D., associate professor of surgery, strongly disagrees.

“I think ‘overdiagnosis’ is an inappropriate term,” said Yim, who was not involved in the research published recently in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. “All of the patients are presumed to have been accurately diagnosed with thyroid cancer, primarily papillary thyroid cancer [the most-common, least-aggressive kind]. The question is whether the thyroid cancer identified, particularly when small, will progress to become symptomatic or deadly.”

That remains the nettlesome question both for physicians and for patients. Is watching and waiting – dubbed “active surveillance” – as safe for small tumors as surgical removal of them?  » Continue Reading


From the expert: How to help families whose children have cancer

February 13, 2014 | by

Learning that a friend or colleague’s child has been diagnosed with cancer can leave people wanting to help – then stopping short because they have no idea how to do so.

Sick child

Friends and family often don’t know what to say to, or how to help, parents whose children have cancer. We offer some guidance.

“So often, people don’t know what to do or say, so they back off, waiting for the family to reach out. Meanwhile, the family is in chaos and trauma, and doesn’t know how or when to reach out,” said Jeanelle Folbrecht, Ph.D., associate clinical professor of psychology in the Department of Supportive Care Medicine at City of Hope.Folbrecht’s overall advice: “Stay engaged with the family in a way that’s not intrusive … that shows that you care, are willing to help, and that you don’t feel helping is a burden,” she said.

In this interview, she offers some guidelines on how best to bring comfort. » Continue Reading