Posts tagged ‘cancer’


Breast cancer among minorities: Access to care is critical to saving lives

October 13, 2014 | by

All women are at some risk of developing the disease in their lifetimes, but breast cancer, like other cancers, has a disproportionate effect on minorities.

multi-ethnic women talk breast cancer

While breast cancer is most common among white women, minority women, especially African-American women, are more likely to die from the disease. Access to screening, quality care and follow-up care are crucial to bridging the gap.

Although white women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, African-American women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethnic groups. They are 40 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women. The five-year survival rate for African-American breast cancer patients is 78 percent, compared to 90 percent for white women, according to the American Cancer Society. Many factors contribute to this disparity, including that black women tend to have cancers that are more aggressive and harder to treat.

But access to screening, prompt follow-up when a mammogram indicates something is not normal, and access to high quality medical care also play a significant role. In fact, City of Hope experts on breast cancer among minorities found that 15 percent of black women who have had breast cancer do not receive yearly follow-up mammograms – despite their increased risk of developing the disease. » Continue Reading


Sometimes, cancer has a warning sign; know the breast cancer symptoms

October 9, 2014 | by

Screening for breast cancer has dramatically increased the number of cancers found before they cause symptoms – catching the disease when it is most treatable and curable.

mammogram

If you notice a change in your breast, such as a lump or clear discharge, check with your doctor immediately.

Mammograms, however, are not infallible.

It’s important to conduct self-exams, and know the signs and symptoms that should be checked by a health care professional.

The most common symptom is a new lump or mass. Cancerous masses tend to be hard, painless and have irregular edges, but breast cancer can also be tender, rounded, soft and even painful. » Continue Reading


Triathlete and breast cancer patient Lisa Birk: Take control (VIDEO)

October 7, 2014 | by


In a single day, former professional triathlete Lisa Birk learned she couldn’t have children and that she had breast cancer.

“Where do you go from there?” she asks.

For Birk, who swims three miles, runs 10 miles and cycles every day, the answer  ultimately was a decision to take control of her cancer care. After receiving less-than-ideal treatment at a local hospital, Birk came to City of Hope.

Having cancer didn’t change her exercise routine, and it wasn’t going to change her ability to manage her life.

Learn more about her story – and why expert cancer care matters – in this video.

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Learn more about breast cancer treatment and research at City of Hope.

Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Practical advice for couples confronting breast cancer

October 3, 2014 | by

One person receives the breast cancer diagnosis, but the cancer affects the entire family.

couple therapy

The Couples Coping with Cancer Together program focuses on good communication and problem-solving skills for couples confronting breast cancer.

Couples, in particular, can find the diagnosis and treatment challenging, especially if they have traditional male/female communication styles.

“Though every individual is unique, men and women often respond differently during times of stress,”  said Courtney Bitz, L.C.S.W., a social worker in the Sheri & Les Biller Patient and Family Resource Center at City of Hope. “This is where men and women can learn from and build upon the strengths of their partner and work together as a team. For many couples, the cancer experience can be an opportunity to grow closer to one another.”

Bitz offers these specific and practical behavior tips. They’ve emerged from the wisdom of past patients and partners, from research and from  clinical experience: » Continue Reading


1 in 8 women? Understanding breast cancer statistics

October 2, 2014 | by

Here’s a statistic you’ll hear and read frequently over the next month: One in eight women born in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in her lifetime.

Breast cancer statistics, explained

Breast cancer statistics say that one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. What those statistics mean.

Although this statement is accurate, based on breast cancer incidence rates in 2013, it’s often misunderstood.

Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., director of cancer etiology at City of Hope, has spent much of her career researching cancer risk, including the factors linked to breast cancer and how risk can be reduced. What that statistic doesn’t mean, she says, is that if you’re gathered at dinner in a group of eight adult women, that one of you is going to develop breast cancer.

Bernstein sheds some light on the oft-repeated statistic: » Continue Reading


Breast cancer infographic: How to reduce breast cancer risk

October 1, 2014 | by

 

Breast cancer infographic
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Meet our doctors: Jasmine Zain on cutaneous T cell lymphoma

September 27, 2014 | by

Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin. The result is rashes and, sometimes, tumors, which can be mistaken for other dermatological conditions. In a small number of people, the disease may progress to the lymph nodes or internal organs, causing serious complications.

Jasmine.Zain.160x190

Jasmine Zain leads a team of specialists who have extensive expertise in handling the most complicated cutaneous T cell lymphoma cases.

Here Jasmine Zain, M.D., associate clinical professor and director of City of Hope’s T Cell Lymphoma Program, discusses how in recent years, greater research efforts, advanced treatment options and more collaboration among physicians have contributed to better care and outcomes for patients, and helped many to return to a normal life.

What is cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and what are the symptoms?

CTCL is a rare form of lymphoma that arises primarily in the skin. It is not to be confused with the more common forms of skin cancer that include melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Lymphomas are cancers of the lymphoid system and usually arise in lymph nodes. However, with skin being the largest lymphoid organ in the body and our first line of defense against the outside environment, occasionally it becomes the site of lymphoma formation. » Continue Reading


Rise in skirt size linked to rise in breast cancer risk. Here’s why

September 26, 2014 | by

Weighing your breast cancer risk? One study suggests a measure to consider is skirt size.

A British study suggests that for each increase in skirt size every 10 years after age 25, the five-year risk of developing breast cancer postmenopause increases from one in 61 to one in 51 – a 77 percent increase in risk.

women trying on skirt

New British study suggest increasing skirt size is an indicator of increase breast cancer risk.

The new study, published online in BMJ Open, was based on information from 93,000 women in a British database for cancer screening between 2005 and 2010. All were 50 years old or older, and their average skirt size was a 10. Three out of four women reported gaining sizes. The average size for these women at age 25 was 8, and when they entered the study, the average size was 10.

The study was conducted by researchers at the Gynecological Cancer Research Center at University College London.

Even when considering other risk factors – such as hormone replacement and family history – increased skirt size emerged as the strongest predictor. The skirt size served as a measure of abdominal weight gain. While scientists haven’t pinned down the exact mechanism linking abdominal fat to breast cancer risk, it is known that obesity increases the amount of estrogen in the body. Many breast cancers rely on this hormone to grow. » Continue Reading


Join the fight to fund cancer research

September 17, 2014 | by

Cancer research has yielded scientific breakthroughs that offer patients more options, more hope for survival and a higher quality of life than ever before.

City of Hope supports the Rally for Medical Research on Capitol Hill this week, which urges lawmakers to make funding medical research a high priority.

City of Hope supports the Rally for Medical Research on Capitol Hill this week, which urges lawmakers to make funding medical research a high priority.

The 14.5 million cancer patients living in the United States are living proof that cancer research saves lives. Now, in addition to the clinic, hospital and laboratory, there is another front for the fight against cancer: The battle for funding to keep this research ongoing.

City of Hope joins the American Association for Cancer Research in support of the Rally for Medical Research on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Sept. 18. Hundreds of organizations and individuals – comprehensive cancer centers, research advocacy groups, clinicians, business leaders, survivors and others – are joining the call to members of Congress to make funding for the National Institutes of Health a priority and stop the chronic decline of public funding for science.
» Continue Reading


AACR report: Now is the time to invest in cancer research

September 16, 2014 | by

Advances in cancer treatment, built on discoveries made in the laboratory then brought to the bedside, have phenomenally changed the reality of living with a cancer diagnosis. More than any other time in history, people diagnosed with cancer are more likely to survive and to enjoy a high quality of life.

Scientist in laboratory

With new drugs approved and new scientific breakthroughs, the chances of surviving cancer have never been higher. Now is the time to keep investing in cancer research.

However, much work remains to be done. On average, one American will die of cancer every minute of every day this year, according to the American Association for Cancer Research, which today released its annual Cancer Progress Report.  Following a year that saw six new cancer drugs approved, an estimated 14.5 million cancer survivors living in the United States, and considerable research breakthroughs, now is the time to continue fueling lifesaving cancer research through investment in the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute and other organizations and agencies devoted to cancer research.

While gains in cancer research have been impressive, the pace of progress has been slowed due to years of budget cuts at the NIH and NCI.

“Incredible strides have been made in advancing our understanding, enhancing prevention and improving therapy of cancer,” said Steven Rosen, M.D., provost and chief scientific officer at City of Hope and director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center. “To maintain momentum with the ultimate goal of maximizing cure of these devastating diseases, the necessary funds must be available.”

» Continue Reading