Posts tagged ‘bladder cancer’


Bladder cancer patient and fitness instructor can still wear a bikini

August 19, 2014 | by

Christine Crews isn’t only a fitness enthusiast, she’s also a personal trainer and fitness instructor. Being active defines her life. So when she was diagnosed with bladder cancer at age 30, she decided she absolutely couldn’t let the disease interfere with that lifestyle.

And it didn’t. For the next 15 years, Crews continued to run marathons, teach fitness classes and train 20 to 30 clients a week, all while fighting her bladder cancer with chemotherapy and periodic tumor removals.

By the age of 45, however, the cancer had spread to 80 percent of her bladder. She was told she would need a cystectomy, that is, the surgical removal of her bladder. » Continue Reading


With cancer, expertise matters – as these cancer patients know (w/VIDEO)

August 12, 2014 | by

A patient diagnosed with cancer – especially a rare, advanced or hard-to-treat cancer – needs specialized care from exceptionally skilled and highly trained experts. That kind of care saves lives, improves quality of life and keeps families whole.

That kind of care is best found at comprehensive cancer centers like City of Hope.

One of the top cancer hospitals for cancer in the United States, according to U.S.News & World Report’s annual rankings, City of Hope has also been awarded the highest level of accreditation from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer and is listed on Becker’s Hospital Review’s 2014 list of “100 Hospitals and Health Systems With Great Oncology Programs.”

Further, recent research found that receiving cancer care at a comprehensive cancer center improves survival of patients with cancers of the breast, lung, liver, stomach, pancreas and oral tissues, among others.

The cancer patients in the video above don’t need to be convinced by such commendations or research, however. They were convinced by City of Hope itself.

Read more about them:

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting us online or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Bladder cancer patient finds he has an alternative to external device

July 9, 2014 | by

When Sheldon Querido, a retired manufacturer’s representative, was diagnosed with bladder cancer, his doctor told him that he’d need to have his bladder removed – and that he’d have to wear an external urine-collection bag for the rest of his life.

Neobladder

An artificial bladder, called a neobladder, enables patients to urinate normally, eliminating the need for an external bag and allowing patients to transition back to their normal life after surgery.

“My first response was ‘I don’t want to live like that,” Querido told ABC 7 in a recent interview. “That’s gonna be a terrible way to live.”

Querido simply couldn’t accept that collecting his urine externally was his only option. The Thousand Oaks resident and his wife decided to get a second opinion at City of Hope. There, they learned there was indeed another choice: an artificial bladder, called a neobladder, built by specialists at City of Hope. » Continue Reading


Urologic cancers: Dispatches from research’s front lines

March 28, 2014 | by

Urologic cancers, including prostate cancer, kidney cancer and bladder cancer, are diagnosed in more than 381,000 Americans each year, and almost 60,000 people die from the diseases. City of Hope’s physicians and scientists are determined to reduce those numbers.

Our groundbreaking research holds the promise of better treatments and cures for the millions of people worldwide battling these difficult cancers. The Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology, led by Timothy Wilson, M.D., Pauline & Martin Collins Family Chair in Urology and director of the Prostate Cancer Program, report the following developments in the treatment of urologic cancers.

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Overcoming drug resistance in metastatic prostate cancer

African American men are 60 percent more likely than white men to get prostate cancer and 2.4 times more likely to die of the disease.

The drug pyrvinium shows promise in the treatment of prostate cancer. Even better, it doesn’t target testosterone.

When prostate cancer metastasizes, it is signaled to grow by a protein called the androgen receptor, which is activated by testosterone. Many men initially respond to hormone treatments that inhibit testosterone, but prostate cancer cells adapt and develop resistance to these therapies, and the cancer almost always returns.

Jeremy Jones, Ph.D., assistant professor of Molecular Pharmacology, found that pyrvinium, a drug used for decades to treat pinworm infections, could treat metastatic prostate cancer without targeting testosterone. Pyrvinium works by inhibiting the DNA binding domain – a different part of the androgen receptor that’s activated when testosterone is blocked –  and could be effective when all other therapies have failed. Jones is testing pyrvinium derivatives in cell cultures and mice, and his goal is to reach phase I clinical trial in the next two years.

Jones is also working with Cy Stein, M.D., Ph.D., Arthur & Rosalie Kaplan Chair of Medical Oncology, to combine the action of two drugs, enzalutamide and abiraterone, to treat prostate cancer that is resistant to hormone therapy. They have designed a compound called COH11023 that inhibits the production of testosterone, prevents testosterone from binding to the androgen receptor and breaks down the androgen receptor to rid the cancer cells of the protein. » Continue Reading


Bladder cancer patient fought symptoms for 15 years (VIDEO)

March 13, 2014 | by

Christine Crews thought she had a bladder infection. Turns out, the Memphis, Tenn., resident had bladder cancer. For 15 years, she fought it with chemotherapy and occasional tumor removals.

When the cancer spread to 80% of her bladder, she was told she would need to have her entire bladder removed. She got a second opinion. And another. Crews wasn’t comfortable with any of the recommendations; she wanted other options. When a urologist friend recommended she call City of Hope, she did.

“They actually listened to what I wanted from the surgery,” Crews said. “They were able to give me options that other hospitals were not able to give me.”

In the video above, Crews shares her story to help other people with bladder cancer understand just how special City of Hope is, and what their options really are.

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Support bladder cancer research at City of Hope and your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar, up to $100,000, by our friends at the Post-it® Brand from 3M. Donate now.

Learn more about City of Hope’s bladder cancer program.

Read the Breakthroughs post “8 questions and answers about bladder cancer.”

 

 


8 questions and answers about bladder cancer

March 7, 2014 | by

Bladder cancer incidence rates have not increased over the past few years — which is a good thing. But unlike cancers of the colon, prostate and lung, they haven’t declined either.

Bladder, shown with kidneys

Bladder cancer rates remain stubbornly unchanged. City of Hope’s Sumanta Pal explores the reasons. Here, the bladder is shown with the kidneys; all part of the renal system.

With more than 74,690 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in the United States each year and approximately 15, 580 deaths from the disease, it’s imperative to find the underlying causes of bladder cancer and why the incidence rate remains stubbornly unchanged.

Here Sumanta Kumar Pal, M.D., co-director of the Kidney Cancer Program at City of Hope, explores both the factors behind the stagnant incidence rates and the disease’s current and future treatments.

What is the current trend for bladder cancer incidence rates?

When reviewing the most recent American Cancer Society statistics, it appears as though bladder cancer incidences have flat-lined to some extent. This is disappointing because there are several other cancers indicated in the same annual report that appear to be on the decline. For instance, the incidence rates on prostate cancer in broad terms seem to be falling.

Furthermore, incidence rates of lung cancer and colorectal cancer also appear to be falling. This may potentially reflect little change in terms of bladder cancer screening; whereas for colorectal cancer and prostate cancer, there’s been a great extent of literature on cancer screening. We just don’t have the same in the context of bladder cancer.

» Continue Reading


Cancer of the breast, colon, lungs … Putting research in perspective

March 3, 2014 | by

No matter how impressive a research study’s conclusion may be – or how seemingly unsurprising – experts are needed to put the findings into context. Perhaps a study’s methodology wasn’t as strong as it could have been. Perhaps the conclusions confirmed that other researchers are on the right track. Perhaps the study missed the mark completely.

Commentary on cancer research

City of Hope physicians offer context and insight on recent cancer research.

City of Hope’s physicians recently weighed in on an array of recent published studies, offering their expertise, insight and perspective via a special commentary feature in Clinical Oncology News.

From Journal of the National Cancer Institute came this recent study: “More Exercise Is Better During Breast Cancer Chemotherapy.”

Commented Joanne Mortimer, M.D., director of the Women’s Cancers Program and professor and vice chair of the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research at City of Hope:

The researchers “demonstrated that as little as 25 to 30 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise three times a week can improve self-reported physical functioning in women undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. Twice that amount of aerobic exercise resulted in a significant reduction in bodily pain and fatigue. … The relationship between physical activity, obesity and breast cancer continues to intrigue us and provide important biological insights.” » Continue Reading