Prostate cancer leads many to prostatectomy. Learn more (w/VIDEOS)

September 9, 2013 | by

Prostate cancer facts, both good and bad, have already been summed up quite succinctly: “Cancer of the prostate gland is a serious health risk for men. In fact, this year nearly 240,000 American men will be diagnosed with it. The good news is that prostate cancer is survivable, especially if it is detected early, before it can spread.”

A diagram of the male urinary system includes a representation of the prostate gland. Removal of a cancerous gland is best done by those with much epxertise, as at City of Hope.

A diagram of the male urinary system includes a representation of the prostate gland. Removal of a cancerous gland is best done by those with much expertise, as at City of Hope.

Those facts will lead many men to undergo a prostatectomy, specifically a robotic-assisted prostatectomy. And, of course, they – and their loved ones – will have questions along the way. A new video series can answer many of those questions.

The series, “Your Guide to Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy,” introduced by Timothy G. Wilson, M.D., the Pauline & Martin Collins Family Chair in Urology at City of Hope, eliminates much of the confusion men and their partners may have about the operation, expected side effects, potential complications and long-term outcomes.

Of course, the proof is in the outcomes. And City of Hope has that proof. As the data on prostate cancer shows:  “Our survivorship exceeds the survival rate of patients treated at other cancer programs that report their data to the Commission on Cancer [a national database maintained jointly by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons].”  

So read, and watch, on. The videos can be found at the links below and also here, under the tab labeled Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

The series includes much more than an explanation of the surgery. It goes on to explain the potential for clinical trials, noting that patients could take part in the Prostate Cancer Database, one of the largest of its kind in the world and "a simple way to help cancer research." Men could also enroll in clinical trials for new drug therapies or new surgical approaches that are proven safe but not yet available for general use.

Latter videos include advice on recovery and where to go for other information.


  • Al Shoy

    I was diagnose with T2 Prostate Cancer late 2005, I (Al) went through robotic-assisted prostatectomy @ UCSD Morris Cancer Center, in La Jolla, California, (CA)
    Carol Salem, MD, urologic oncologic was my surgeon May 22 2006, I am going on my 7 year remission ….
    AL S
    San Diego CA

    • http://www.cityofhope.org City of Hope

      Congrats on your recovery, Al! We wish you all the health and happiness. Thank you for your readership and support.