Meditopes: Hitching cancer drugs to antibodies (w/VIDEO)

July 1, 2014 | by

Scientists have long searched for ways to bolster the immune system to fight diseases that seem to evade it, including cancer.

City of Hope scientists discovered what they call a meditope, an opening in the center of an antibody and a peptide that fits neatly into it, creating the perfect "hitch" that allows medicines to be attached to the antibodies for delivery to tumor sites.

City of Hope scientists discovered what they call a meditope, an opening in the center of an antibody and a peptide that fits neatly into it, creating the perfect "hitch" that allows medicines to be attached to the antibodies for delivery to tumor sites.

Many have focused on monoclonal antibodies, trying to use them as trucks to drop off payloads of drugs right at the site of an infection or tumor. The problem, however, has been welding the payload to the truck. While analyzing the structure of these antibodies, City of Hope scientists discovered a “hitch” – a hole in the center of the antibody’s structure, and a peptide that fits cleanly and easily into it.

This universal “hitch” – named a meditope by John C. Williams, Ph.D., and his research team that discovered it – has the potential to arm the immune system against cancer as well as other diseases.

Williams says his team is still exploring the applications but that the discovery has the potential to dramatically change oncology, radiology and other disciplines. Because the peptide can easily link to therapeutic molecules and hitch them to antibodies, the use for meditopes goes beyond cancer. Some of the diseases Williams and his team have considered so far include rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and macular degeneration.

This video explains how Williams and his team discovered the meditope.