Multimedia


Pancreatic cancer: Diagnosis, treatments and new research (w/PODCAST)

August 31, 2015 | by
pancreatic cancer

Laleh Melstrom discusses pancreatic cancer, it’s diagnoses, treatments and the latest research developments.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers to treat because it rarely shows symptoms in its early stages. Today, however, aggressive therapies and specialized care can significantly improve outcomes and increase the likelihood of a cure. City of Hope has one of the most experienced pancreatic cancer programs in the United States with a multidisciplinary team that takes an integrated approach to fighting cancers of the pancreas.

In this podcast, Laleh Melstrom, M.D., M.S., an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Surgery, discusses pancreatic cancer, its diagnoses, treatments and the latest research developments. A specialist in liver and pancreatic surgery, she advises people to pay attention to changes in the body in order to catch cancer early.

“Listen to your body — if something is not right and it’s persistently not right, you need to get it evaluated,” she said. “If you’re having abdominal bloating, weight loss, early satiety or getting full very quickly, reflux that’s not alleviated by normal acid blockers – these are all potentially signs that something is not right. I’m not saying that those are definitive signs of potential pancreatic cancer, but if your body’s biology and physiology is not behaving as it has for many, many years, something has changed, and I would persist on getting that evaluated.”

 

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Acute myeloid leukemia: What you should know (w/PODCAST)

August 24, 2015 | by

acute myeloid leukemia

Renowned hematologist-oncologist Guido Marcucci discusses AML, its symptoms, diagnoses and treatments.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by a rapidly-developing cancer in the myeloid line of blood cells, which is responsible for producing red blood cells, platelets and several types of white blood cells called granulocytes. Because AML grows rapidly, it can quickly crowd out normal blood cells, leading to anemia, susceptibility to infections and uncontrolled bleeding. Due to the aggressive nature of AML, this disease usually requires intensive treatment, which may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

The following are symptoms typical for AML:

• Fever with or without an infection
• Frequent bruising
• Night sweats
• Pain in the bones or joints
• Pain or feeling of fullness below the ribs
• Petechiae (flat, pinpoint spots under the skin caused by bleeding)
• Shortness of breath
• Weakness or feeling tired

Here, Guido Marcucci, M.D., co-director of the Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research at City of Hope, discusses AML, its symptoms, diagnoses and treatments. Marcucci is also a professor of the Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation at City of Hope, and director of the Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Leukemia Research.

“AML may be a prototype of cancer and how cancer develops and eventually persists after treatment,” he says.

 

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Where Carly Rae Jepson’s “I Really Like You” meets science (w/VIDEO)

August 18, 2015 | by

Many teenagers take a break from academics during the summer, but not the eight high school students enrolled in the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Creativity Awards program at City of Hope. They took the opportunity to obtain as much hands-on research experience as possible, learning from City of Hope researchers and scientists along the way. And, while they were at it, they made a music video.

Through the CIRM Creativity Awards program, the students worked full-time as members of City of Hope biomedical research teams, studying stem cell science and developmental biology research. As part of their work, students shared their experience in the lab by creating videos and blogs, which were shared on The Stem Cellar, the official CIRM blog.

This year, the CIRM students created a music parody video to Carly Rae Jepson’s “I Really Like You,” now called “We’re Really Close to a Breakthrough.” The video, solely produced by the students, earned an honorable mention for best video in the program. » Continue Reading


Breast cancer: How to reduce your risk (w/PODCAST)

August 17, 2015 | by
breast cancer prevention

Linda Bosserman is a premier medical oncologist at City of Hope in Rancho Cucamonga. Her primary interests include women’s cancer care, cancer prevention, clinical trials and quality cancer care delivery in community practice.

About one in eight women will develop breast cancer at some point in her life. In fact, breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women, behind skin cancer.

Although women can’t change some risk factors, such as genetics and the natural aging process, there are certain things they can do to lower their risk of breast cancer, such as eating right, exercising and limiting alcohol consumption.

Here, Linda Bosserman, M.D., a medical oncologist at City of Hope in Rancho Cucamonga, California, discusses ways that women can help reduce their risk of developing breast cancer.

As she says: “If you can’t do anything except walk, that’s a good start, but it has to be at a pace that really gets your heart rate up for a period of time. Walking is acceptable. I tell women, ‘If you can’t do anything else, buy a dog and walk four miles a day. It’ll keep your weight under control and you’ll improve your fitness.”

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Surviving cancer: What do I do now? (w/PODCAST)

August 10, 2015 | by
life after cancer

Elizabeth Lynn Meyering is an assistant clinical professor in the in the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research at City of Hope’s Simi Valley location.

Cancer affects not just the cancer patient, but everyone around him or her, even after treatment is complete.

The challenges can include the fear of cancer recurrence, coping with cancer’s economic impact and the struggle to achieve work-life balance post-treatment. Family members and loved ones of cancer patients often share these challenges, especially the fear of cancer recurrence.

That’s why City of Hope developed the Center for Cancer Survivorship – a long-term follow-up program designed to create a bridge between cancer treatment and community medical care.

Here, Elizabeth Lynn Meyering, M.D., discusses the next steps in surviving cancer, explaining what cancer survivors can do to promote a healthy lifestyle at home and meet their need for follow-up care and treatment. She also explains what families can do to help everyone through these tough times.

 

 

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Bladder cancer: What you need to know (w/INFOGRAPHIC)

August 7, 2015 | by

Bladder Cancer Infographic

 

» Continue Reading


Urologic cancers and urinary stones (w/PODCAST)

August 3, 2015 | by
urologic cancer

Donald Hannoun, an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope ǀ Antelope Valley, explains the changes in his field, and explains what urinary stones are and what patients need to know about them.

Urinary tract stones are hard masses, or calculi, that form in the urinary tract and may cause pain, bleeding or an infection, or even block of the flow of urine. Urinary tract stones begin to form in a kidney and may enlarge in a ureter or the bladder.

Depending on where a stone is located, it may be called a kidney stone, ureteral stone or bladder stone. But stones aren’t the only common urinary tract condition. Urologic cancers include cancers of the bladder, kidney, prostate and testicles, and are all relatively common.

The treatment of urologic cancers, including bladder cancer, is rapidly evolving.

In this podcast, urologic oncologic surgeon and kidney stone specialist Donald Hannoun, M.D., an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Urology and Urologic Oncology at City of Hope | Antelope Valley, explains the changes in his field, what urinary stones are, and what  patients need to know about them.

 

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: What you need to know (w/INFOGRAPHIC)

July 31, 2015 | by

City of Hope lymphoma facts infographic

» Continue Reading


The link between obesity and cancer risk (w/PODCAST)

July 27, 2015 | by
obesity and cancer

Misagh Karimi specializes in hematology-oncology at City of Hope ǀ Corona.

Many Americans understand that obesity is tied to heart disease and diabetes but, according to a new survey, too few – only 7 percent – know that obesity increases the risk of cancer.

Specific biological characteristics can increase cancer risk in obese people, and multiple studies have shown correlations between obesity and cancer recurrence, such as with breast, colon, esophageal and other cancers.

Here, medical oncologist Misagh Karimi, M.D., discusses  the connection between obesity and cancer.

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.


Learn about cutaneous T cell lymphoma (w/PODCAST)

July 20, 2015 | by
Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

Christiane Querfeld is a board-certified dermatologist and dermatopathologist with advanced fellowship training in cutaneous lymphoma. Her clinical practice focuses on the diagnosis, care and management of patients with cutaneous lymphoma and related diseases.

Cutaneous T cell lymphomas are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that arise when infection-fighting white blood cells in the lymphatic system – called lymphocytes – become malignant and affect the skin.

A primary symptom is a rash that arises initially in areas of the skin that are not normally exposed to sunlight. From phototherapy to topical creams, the first defense is to relieve the itching.

But is it eczema? Is it psoriasis? When do you suspect cutaneous T cell lymphoma?

Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Here, Christiane Querfeld, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Program at City of Hope, discusses the disease, its diagnosis and its treatment.

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For other interviews with City of Hope experts,  go to our list of City of Hope podcasts.

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Learn more about becoming a patient or getting a second opinion at City of Hope by visiting our website or by calling 800-826-HOPE (4673). You may also request a new patient appointment online. City of Hope staff will explain what’s required for a consult at City of Hope and help you determine, before you come in, whether or not your insurance will pay for the appointment.