In the oncology world, ASCO is the hive – and researchers are the bees

May 30, 2014 | by

Scientists know that bees often will travel great distances to explore the world around them, then return to the hive to share what they’ve learned through intricate and detailed communication with thousands of their comrades. These journeys of discovery keep the colony educated about its surroundings and better able to survive and thrive in a sometimes challenging environment.

Rosen

Steven T. Rosen, City of Hope’s provost and chief scientific officer.

Not unlike these apian explorers, cancer researchers spend much of their time studying a particular corner of the scientific world. They then gather with their colleagues to share their findings, spreading the wealth of their knowledge to benefit all.

Many City of Hope physicians will journey to one such hive of information this week — the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, or ASCO, which takes place May 30 to June 3 in Chicago. Hosting more than 25,000 oncology professionals, the meeting is among the largest of its kind.

City of Hope's work is well-represented, with more than 40 researchers sharing their progress. While there, these leaders in the field will learn about the work of other scientists and spread awareness about City of Hope itself.

Major advances over the past half century have prolonged many lives and reduced human suffering due to cancer, but further work is needed, said Steven T. Rosen, M.D., City of Hope’s provost and chief scientific officer.

“The interaction that takes place at the ASCO annual meeting will foster collaboration among researchers and clinicians, renewing our sense of urgency and ultimately furthering our collective progress to make a meaningful, tangible impact against the disease,” he said.

The roster of findings to be presented by City of Hope experts will include:

But that's just the beginning. Learn more about the research to be presented at the 50th annual ASCO meeting. Scientists will be.